Convenient Career For Physician Solutions Guidelines

Smartphone “It’s concerning, though not surprising, that the study found that so few apps replied appropriately to problematic information entered into a health app.” “For example, an app that enables accurate entry of blood imp source pressure with appropriate indications for high and low blood pressures may be viewed positively by a physician, and if that app requires a login every time it is started, a consumer may feel it is too burdensome to use and rate it poorly,” Singh said. Approximately half of all Americans are living with at least one chronic medical problem such as heart disease, diabetes or asthma, researchers note in the journal Health Affairs, online December 5th. Related: Apple Releases Medical App Software For the current study, researchers evaluated apps targeted at people who live with asthma, arthritis, diabetes, high blood pressure, depression, lung disease, liver disease, kidney disease, heart failure or addiction to drugs, alcohol or tobacco. They also looked at apps for people who have survived a stroke, battled cancer, been diagnosed with memory loss or dementia, are obese or are living with pain. Many of the more than 165,000 health apps available aim to help people track their condition day-to-day, stay on track with medication or at-home testing, share information electronically with their care teams and get education and encouragement between doctor appointments. Nearly all the apps in the study let people enter information into their phone about their health that day, such as a daily blood sugar or blood pressure level or whether they were feeling suicidal. But only 28 of these apps reacted appropriately when the reviewers entered a dangerous value – a blood pressure that was sky-high, a super-low blood sugar level or a suicidal mood, for instance. “Many applications lack sufficient and thorough testing for accuracy, exposing consumers to significant risks.” Even though many apps offered tracking functions, education, reminders and alerts that could be useful in theory to people with chronic illnesses, few of the apps provided tailored guidance on specific actions users should take, the study found. Related: New App Helps Doctors Catch Suicide Risk While apps have the potential to help with health, consumers should still be wary, said Sarah Blenner, a public health researcher at the University of California, Los Angeles, who wasn’t involved in the study. “It’s concerning, though not surprising, that the study found that so few apps replied appropriately to problematic information entered into a health app,” Blenner said by email.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/health-apps-might-not-be-so-hot-doctors-find-n696656?cid=public-rss_20161219

Our wonderful network of students and graduates does so much to share the opportunities we offer with their friends and family. We are grateful for their hard work. Our mission is to improve our students lives through education, and it is rewarding to partner with our referrers to extend our reach to military families as well. This years donation will benefit the Operation Purple Program, which focuses on helping military families cope with the stress of deployment, homecoming and injuries. Their summer camps, family retreats and other programs connect military families with others in similar situations, enabling them to learn proven communication techniques and make positive memories while hiking, canoeing, crafting and more. Operation Purple has sent nearly 60,000 military kids to this free camp experience since 2004. In 2016, Operation Purple served 2,492 campers in 25 different locations. Of the campers, more than 41 percent had a parent who was wounded, ill or injured, and 53 percent had a parent deploy in the 15 months prior to their camp experience. We are so grateful for Career Steps partnership in bringing these great opportunities into the lives of military families, said National Military Family Association Executive Director Joyce Wessel Raezer. These funds will make it possible for nearly 20 children to enjoy time in the outdoors with other kids who can understand their unique family situations. The donation is only one of many ways Career Step supports the military community. try this More than 15,000 military spouses and service members have trained with Career Step over the years, and the school has been recognized as a Military Friendly School for six years in a row. In addition to being an original Discover More member of the Military Spouse Employment Program (MSEP), Career Step is also a MyCAA-approved school and offers quarterly scholarships for military spouses in partnership with the National Military Family Association.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.prweb.com/releases/2016/12/prweb13927851.htm

You may also be interested to read